A new house? A nice house.

Some readers may not know this yet, but presently I work for a small non-profit. I do marketing and graphic design for a mission mobilizer called M-DAT. Since the work is missions related I raise money in order to be there, like 70% of American missionaries.

For the past five years (as of next month) my wife and I have been in various stages of fundraising, working outside of the ministry as needed and part-time for the ministry as moneys allowed. We’ve never reached full support. In other words, I’ve never been able to work full-time at full salary indefinitely. Life has been in limbo.

I’ve been able to work full-time at a partial salary for most of this year, but come December the money looked to run dry. So my wife and I worked out a plan: We figured we’d be able to continue working part-time with M-DAT if we moved to a larger town with better prospects for other part-time work and less expensive housing. So late this summer we made two eight-hour drives to such a community looking at real estate.

Some may wonder why we wouldn’t just sell our house and rent. While we like owning a home, renting would be fine. However, we hope to take the next two or three years to work on our arts and crafts — ceramics, crochet, writing — while looking at the possibility of grad school, which I’ve mentioned here numerous times now. Thus we need space (and the flexibility to modify said space) for my kiln and clay studio as well as storage for my wife’s yarn and scarves.

So we made an offer on a house, a 100 year old house we liked quite a bit.

facade-at-475.jpg

It’s in great shape (except for the roof) and completely modern with the formal layout of an older home. We did this at 9 a.m. and then drove home. Halfway home my boss called my wife’s cell phone and gave us the good news that a very large donation arrived in the mail for us. This donation was very unexpected and would essentially allow us to be fully supported for almost two years.

But we’d already made an offer on the house. We’d already taken the time to drive to Nebraska, look at 16 different homes and mess around with paperwork at the bank. Now we learn about the new money? After we’ve agonized over this decision for months and become somewhat emotionally attached to this house? God does have a sense of humor.

And we were confused; very confused.

The sellers countered which gave us an out, but we weren’t able to ignore everything that had transpired. So after numerous conversations this weekend, where we hashed and rehashed the same things again and again, we decided to accept the seller’s counter-offer. I won’t go into the myriad of details, tangible and intangible, that influenced our decision. Suffice it to say that the contract is contingent on the sale of our Arkansas house, and we decided that if it doesn’t sell we weren’t meant to move to Nebraska.

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About pcNielsen
Paul Nielsen founded The Aesthetic Elevator late in 2005. He owns a piece of paper, located somewhere in his house (not on the wall), stating that he earned a B.F.A. from the University of Nebraska around about 2001. While there, he studied studied architecture, graphic design and ceramics, graduating with a degree in studio art. Paul presently serves as communications manager for a small non-profit doing their print design and marketing. He spends as much time sculpting in his studio as possible — which is not nearly enough. Visit his website at pcNielsen.com.

2 Responses to A new house? A nice house.

  1. balm says:

    either way if you move or not, you should stop by sometime on your way to nebraska. we are right next to kansas city, and we would love to meet you in person. we know that whatever works out was ment to be. blessings, darin & shannon

  2. bibi says:

    hi can u please send me pictures of new designing of houses and decorations

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