Traffic Design: Get out of your car

In a GOOD Magazine article titled Decongestion, five international plans geared at getting people out of their cars are examined:

    * Bus Rapid Transit
    * Naked Streets
    * Bicycle Planning and Complete Streets
    * Congestion Pricing
    * Intermodal Systems

From the article:

    “In the States, cycling is still for the most part recreational. In Copenhagen, though, perhaps the world’s most bicycle-friendly city, 36 percent of commuters rode to work in 2003, 33 percent used public transit, and 27 percent drove. But Copenhagen’s streets haven’t always been so balanced: In the 1970s, when bike riding was at an all-time low, the city’s traffic-congested downtown resembled American cities of the same era. Yet unlike their American counterparts, who tried to solve congestion by building more roads, Danish planners took an alternative approach: they tried to reduce the number of cars.” [emphasis mine]

An Interesting read. See the entire article via this link. The following video accompanies the article, where a Portland musician sings a song about the city’s new overhead tram.

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j60nq73EAYk]

I mentioned this to my office-mate, who is from Portland, who reported back that this particular piece of mass-transit only benefits about 2% of the population. Apparently it was installed on account of a lack of buildable land for a parking structure adjacent to a particular hospital. Regardless, the written information in the article is good.

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About pcNielsen
Paul Nielsen founded The Aesthetic Elevator late in 2005. He owns a piece of paper, located somewhere in his house (not on the wall), stating that he earned a B.F.A. from the University of Nebraska around about 2001. While there, he studied studied architecture, graphic design and ceramics, graduating with a degree in studio art. Paul presently serves as communications manager for a small non-profit doing their print design and marketing. He spends as much time sculpting in his studio as possible — which is not nearly enough. Visit his website at pcNielsen.com.

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